Time Series

I’m not sure this is an activity I can use in the future as its more relevant to now but I wanted to relate time series to something current. I struggle to teach these topics as I feel we often use “made up” data. I like to use the students data for many data topics…

EG: I ask students to hold their breath on two occasions in a lesson and record the times for both and plot a scatter diagram

I plot their test 1 and test 2 scores from recent assessments and compare the results.

If I’m looking at frequency tables we collect data on students favourite number between 1-100 or the number of pets owned.

All of these are time consuming but I feel its better to look at a couple of scatter diagrams or frequency tables, pie charts etc in a lesson if the data has come from the students because we can predict how we think the results may look and discuss any outliers.

When it comes to Times Series I find collecting student information tricker. So we often look at sales of ice-cream over the course of a year or similar which is data that is often made up for the sake of the lesson.

I thought about how covid-19 would affect certain time series and after reading an article about a huge drop in passenger numbers at Heathrow in 2020 I decided to focus on passenger numbers at Heathrow for this topic.

Scatter Diagrams

I had a look at GDP, weather, population, Area of land to create some scatter diagrams.

I wondered about what students could deduce from the results and comment on the correlations.

I will be explaining how I obtained the data and discuss how the scatter diagrams are misleading because of the small sample size. We will discuss what can be deduced from the results and if the results are misleading/bias.

Factors and Factorising

Year 9 have been looking at simplifying algebraic fractions. They have spent the last half term looking at Fractions, Decimals and Percentages and the last few weeks expanding and factorising expressions so I thought I showed them the following and then next lesson the series of TRUE or FALSE statements. I thought that this would be a good idea to help students understand why some fractions can be simplified and others can’t. I have wondered if it might be a good idea to use the “factors” slides in my next lesson on factors as and extension of the basic idea of 7 is a factor of 35 etc.

Surface Area and Volume of Cylinders

I have been thinking a lot about a recent interaction on Twitter and how teachers calculate the surface area of a prism. I really liked the idea of looking at the areas of the cross sections (especially as it linked to volume of a prism) and adding the area of the net of the “tube” so, multiplying the perimeter of the cross section by the length. I have played around with a similar format I used for surface area recently and it worked well but I think I like to now move the students to using this approach. Plus I’d like them to practice volume alongside surface area so they can distinguish the two.

Interaction above

I made this after speaking to @MRSEVCartwright

Thanks to @mathsteacher09 for the suggestion of using circles not side elevation images for the area of the cross section